American Association for Cancer Research
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Supplementary Figures 1-11 and Information from Irradiation Alters Selection for Oncogenic Mutations in Hematopoietic Progenitors

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posted on 2023-03-30, 18:48 authored by Andriy Marusyk, Matias Casás-Selves, Curtis J. Henry, Vadym Zaberezhnyy, Jelena Klawitter, Uwe Christians, James DeGregori
Supplementary Figures 1-11 and Information from Irradiation Alters Selection for Oncogenic Mutations in Hematopoietic Progenitors

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ARTICLE ABSTRACT

Exposure to ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging carcinogens is strongly associated with induction of malignancies. Prevailing paradigms attribute this association to the induction of oncogenic mutations, as the incidence of oncogenic events is thought to limit initiation and progression of cancers. On the other hand, random mutagenic and genotoxic effects of irradiation are likely to alter progenitor cell populations and the microenvironment, thus altering the selective effects of oncogenic mutations. Using competitive bone marrow transplantation experiments in mice, we show that ionizing irradiation leads to a persistent decline in the numbers and fitness of hematopoietic stem cells, in part resulting from persistent induction of reactive oxygen species. Previous irradiation dramatically alters the selective effects of some oncogenic mutations, substantially inhibiting clonal expansion and leukemogenesis driven by Bcr-Abl or activated N-Ras oncogenes but enhancing the selection for and leukemogenesis driven by the activated Notch1 mutant ICN. Irradiation-dependent selection for ICN expression occurs in a hematopoietic stem cell–enriched pool, which should facilitate the accumulation of additional oncogenic events at a committed T-progenitor stage critical for formation of T-lymphocytic leukemia stem cells. Enhancement of ICN-driven selection and leukemogenesis by previous irradiation is in part non–cell autonomous, as partial restoration of normal hematopoiesis can reverse these effects of irradiation. These studies show that irradiation substantially alters the adaptive landscape in hematopoietic progenitors and suggest that the causal link between irradiation and carcinogenesis might involve increased selection for particular oncogenic mutations. [Cancer Res 2009;69(18):7262–9]