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Supplementary Figure Legends and Tables 2-9 from Gut Mycobiota Dysbiosis Is Associated with Melanoma and Response to Anti–PD-1 Therapy

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posted on 2024-04-02, 07:21 authored by Natalia Szóstak, Luiza Handschuh, Anna Samelak-Czajka, Katarzyna Tomela, Bernadeta Pietrzak, Marcin Schmidt, Łukasz Galus, Jacek Mackiewicz, Andrzej Mackiewicz, Piotr Kozlowski, Anna Philips

Supplementary Figure Legends and Tables 2-9

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Narodowe Centrum Nauki (NCN)

Narodowe Centrum Badań i Rozwoju (NCBR)

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ARTICLE ABSTRACT

Recent research indicates that gut microbiota may be vital in the advancement of melanoma. In this study, we found that melanoma patients exhibited a distinct gut mycobiota structure compared with healthy participants. Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, and Neurospora crassa were more abundant in samples from patients with melanoma, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Debaryomyces hansenii were less abundant. During anti–PD-1 treatment, the relative amount of Malassezia restricta and C. albicans increased. A higher level of Saccharomyces paradoxus was associated with a positive response to anti–PD-1 treatment, whereas a higher level of Tetrapisispora blattae was associated with a lack of clinical benefits. High levels of M. restricta and C. albicans, elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, and being overweight were linked to increased risk of melanoma progression and poorer response to anti–PD-1 treatment. Thus, this study has revealed melanoma-associated mycobiome dysbiosis, characterized by altered fungal composition and fungi species associated with a higher risk of melanoma progression, identifying a role for the gut mycobiome in melanoma progression.

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