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Supplementary Figure 5 from Identification of Griseofulvin as an Inhibitor of Centrosomal Clustering in a Phenotype-Based Screen

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posted on 2023-03-30, 17:25 authored by Blanka Rebacz, Thomas O. Larsen, Mads H. Clausen, Mads H. Rønnest, Harald Löffler, Anthony D. Ho, Alwin Krämer
Supplementary Figure 5 from Identification of Griseofulvin as an Inhibitor of Centrosomal Clustering in a Phenotype-Based Screen

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ARTICLE ABSTRACT

A major drawback of cancer chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific targets which would allow for the selective eradication of malignant cells without affecting healthy tissues. In contrast with normal cells, most tumor cells contain multiple centrosomes, associated with the formation of multipolar mitotic spindles and chromosome segregation defects. Many tumor cells regain mitotic stability after clonal selection by the coalescence of multiple centrosomes into two functional spindle poles. To overcome the limitations of current cancer treatments, we have developed a cell-based screening strategy to identify small molecules that inhibit centrosomal clustering and thus force tumor cells with supernumerary centrosomes to undergo multipolar mitoses, and subsequently, apoptosis. Using a chemotaxonomic selection of fungi from a large culture collection, a relatively small but diverse natural product extract library was generated. Screening of this compound library led to the identification of griseofulvin, which induced multipolar spindles by inhibition of centrosome coalescence, mitotic arrest, and subsequent cell death in tumor cell lines but not in diploid fibroblasts and keratinocytes with a normal centrosome content. The inhibition of centrosome clustering by griseofulvin was not restricted to mitotic cells but did occur during interphase as well. Whereas the formation of multipolar spindles was dynein-independent, depolymerization of interphase microtubules seemed to be mechanistically involved in centrosomal declustering. In summary, by taking advantage of the tumor-specific phenotype of centrosomal clustering, we have developed a screening strategy that might lead to the identification of drugs which selectively target tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. [Cancer Res 2007;67(13):6342–50]

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