American Association for Cancer Research
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Supplementary Figure 1 from Toll-like Receptor-6 Signaling Prevents Inflammation and Impacts Composition of the Microbiota During Inflammation-Induced Colorectal Cancer

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posted on 2023-04-03, 22:04 authored by Jee-Hyun Kim, Melissa C. Kordahi, Denise Chac, R. William DePaolo

Proportion of genus-level bacteria affected by the interaction of housing and genotype

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ARTICLE ABSTRACT

Tightly regulated immune responses must occur in the intestine to avoid unwanted inflammation, which may cause chronic sequela leading to diseases such as colorectal cancer. Toll-like receptors play an important role in preventing aberrant immune responses in the intestine by sensing endogenous commensal microbiota and delivering important regulatory signals to the tissue. However, the role that specific innate receptors may play in the development of chronic inflammation and their impact on the composition of the colonic microbiota is not well understood. Using a model of inflammation-induced colorectal cancer, we found that Lactobacillus species are lost more quickly in wild-type (WT) mice than TLR6-deficient mice resulting in overall differences in bacterial composition. Despite the longer retention of Lactobacillus, the TLR6-deficient mice presented with more tumors and a worse overall outcome. Restoration of the lost Lactobacillus species suppressed inflammation, reduced tumor number, and prevented change in the abundance of Proteobacteria only when given to WT mice, indicating the effect of these Lactobacillus are TLR6 dependent. We found that the TLR6-dependent effects of Lactobacillus could be dissociated from one another via the involvement of IL10, which was necessary to dampen the inflammatory microenvironment, but had no effect on bacterial composition. Altogether, these data suggest that innate immune signals can shape the composition of the microbiota under chronic inflammatory conditions, bias the cytokine milieu of the tissue microenvironment, and influence the response to microbiota-associated therapies.

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