American Association for Cancer Research
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Supplementary Figure 1 from Inactivation of Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Enhances Antitumoral Immune Response by Promoting Dendritic Cell and T Lymphocyte Infiltration

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posted on 2023-03-30, 20:00 authored by Masato Murakami, Chiara Francavilla, Ilaria Torselli, Monica Corada, Luigi Maddaluno, Antonio Sica, Gianluca Matteoli, Iliyan Dimitrov Iliev, Alberto Mantovani, Maria Rescigno, Ugo Cavallaro, Elisabetta Dejana
Supplementary Figure 1 from Inactivation of Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A Enhances Antitumoral Immune Response by Promoting Dendritic Cell and T Lymphocyte Infiltration

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ARTICLE ABSTRACT

Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A)–null dendritic cells (DCs) are more motile and effective than their wild-type counterpart in promoting contact hypersensitivity reaction. Here, we show that the growth and aggressiveness of pancreatic islet cell carcinoma induced by SV40 T antigen expression in β cells (Rip1Tag2 mice) are significantly reduced in JAM-A–null mice. Because these tumor cells do not express JAM-A, we focused on changes in stroma reactivity. In the absence of JAM-A, tumors showed a small but significant reduction in angiogenesis and a marked increase in the immune reaction with enhanced infiltration of DCs (CD11c+ and MHC-II+) and CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. In contrast, phagocyte number was not affected. DC capacity to produce cytokines was not significantly altered, but transmigration through JAM-A–null endothelial cells was increased as compared with JAM-A–positive endothelium. On adoptive transfer, JAM-A−/− DCs were recruited to tumors at slightly but significantly higher rate than JAM-A+/+ DCs. Ablation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells with specific antibodies abrogated the inhibitory effect of JAM-A deletion on tumor growth and angiogenesis. These findings support the idea that, in the Rip1Tag2 tumor model, abrogation of JAM-A reduces cancer development by increasing antitumor immune response. Cancer Res; 70(5); 1759–65